Wimps, Posers, Hipsters and Haters – leave the hall!

•July 8, 2011 • 2 Comments

Fotolia_324561_Subscription_L

My very excellent friend Leticia runs a blog where she muses on metal, writing and life in general. Occasionally she has guest posters and yesterday she featured a post from Tom Valcanis, an Australian freelance journalist. I have the utmost respect for Tom – he’s a fantastic writer and obviously a very smart guy – but this time, I think he’s got it all wrong.

The article in question is "Wimps, Posers and Hipsters – leave the hall!". Before I get too much further, click through to Tish’s blog and have a read of the article.

The crux of Tom’s argument is that in this mad, mad, internet-driven world, where web sites battle to the death for every eyeball and precious advertising dollar, certain high profile publications are taking the approach of deliberately baiting their audience, and of writing with contempt, to the detriment of metal in general. According to Tom, these writers are "hipsters armed with BFAs, copies of Bukowski and Joy Division t-shirts, and they’re laughing at you."

Now, I hate hipsters as much as the next metalhead. But the two publications Tom holds up as examples of this trend are, I believe, being unfairly categorised.

Firstly, US print and online magazine Decibel. Decibel is reasonably new, having started in 2004 – certainly it doesn’t have the decades-long pedigree of Kerrang or Metal Hammer. But to my mind, Decibel is the only intelligent print publication for metal that’s around today. It does not stoop to damaging and stupid gimmicks like "10 hottest chicks in metal" to sell copies. It features intelligent and interesting articles – not just reviews and interviews . The vinyl "flexi-disc" offer to subscribers – each issue containing tracks that are unique, previously unreleased, and not available anywhere else – is a great example of adding actual value to the physical magazine in an age where print is struggling to stay relevant. And yes, Decibel has some fun columns.

The column highlighted as particularly troublesome is a relatively new one called "Disposable Heroes", where a guest writer will discuss why, in their opinion, an album universally hailed as a classic is actually a turd. Tom says "you’re paying $10 or more to be laughed at by the metal equivalent of your schoolyard tormentors." What he doesn’t point out is that this column is a complement to the longer-running "Justify your shitty taste" column, where a guest writer defends an album that was universally panned. No one’s laughing at you, Tom – these kinds of columns show that metal is diverse, and opinions are indeed like the oft-quoted arseholes. They say to readers "hey – If you hated the Blue Record or actually liked St Anger, maybe you’re not the only one".

The second publication under fire for allegedly harbouring hipster tendencies is the metal blog, MetalSucks. Tom goes all out on the offensive, positioning the site and founders "at the vanguard of the hipster metal journalist revolution, soaking in all the pompous art school posturing they could muster from their $20,000 a year degrees in fine arts that their parents most likely paid for". Ouch. I don’t think who allegedly paid for anyone’s alleged education has any bearing on how good a writer they are.

I’ve been reading MetalSucks for a couple of years now, from when it was a much smaller operation than it is today, and watching it grow has been an exercise in watching someone mostly get things right. Rather than a metal news site in the vein of MetalUnderground.com or MetalAsFuck.net – sites that post news and play it mostly straight – MetalSucks is a metal blog. Blogs, whether they remain personal blogs or grow to 16 regular contributors (as MetalSucks has), are where writers can feel free to post whatever they want and vent opinions in a much less formal manner than a traditional magazine, on a more rapid timeline, with the ability to respond to audience interaction, and usually without the editorial overhead. Sure, some magazines may be becoming more blog-like and some blogs are taking on roles traditionally belonging to formal publications – but the fact remains that a blog operates under a different set of rules.

MetalSucks embodies the blog by having a diverse stable of contributors that give their (often wildly differing) opinions. As a regular reader, I think I’m qualified to defend MetalSucks against the charge "they figured in order to cut through to a seemingly vapid and punch-drunk metal crowd […] you have to actively and almost passionately loathe the genre you cover". Follow the blog for a week and it’s easy to see that all of the contributors truly love metal – different kinds of metal. It’s not uncommon for one writer to bag one particular band or release only to have it defended by another writer in a subsequent post. They’re not shy about unbiased heapings of praise and vitriol, and the immense success that MetalSucks has enjoyed – both in attracting regular, loyal readership and advertising – indicates there is a large and eager audience for that style of writing.

Tom has torn down two very different metal publications because of one thing they have in common: doing something different. In both cases it’s something different that is helping them succeed where countless others are failing. The world is moving on and yearning for the "good old days" doesn’t do anyone any good. We should be looking to these kinds of publications as examples of what IS capturing eyeballs and attention.

And we don’t need to worry about metal – it’s survived a long time all by itself. Metalheads are more intelligent than they’re being given credit for.

The best metal drummer?

•July 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment

122076_7695

I wasn’t going to post this… but after yesterday’s drummer confession session I thought why the hell not.

From that source of all things metal and often all things stupid, Blabbermouth, comes the revelation that Chris Adler of Lamb of God has been named #1 in Modern Drummer Reader’s Poll for the metal category.

The top five results were:

01. Chris Adler (LAMB OF GOD)
02. Joey Jordison (SLIPKNOT)
03. Morgan Rose (SEVENDUST)
04. Gene Hoglan (FEAR FACTORY, TESTAMENT, DETHKLOK)
05. Brann Dailor (MASTODON)

I don’t know if Modern Drummer readers were able to nominate individuals or if the survey had a fixed number of options, but whenever I think “greatest metal drummer” the first name that pops into my mind is Dave Lombardo of Slayer. Sure, Chris Adler is no slouch, and neither are any of the others in that top 5 listing, but Dave Lombardo is just phenomenal full stop. He’s one of the best drummers I can think of in ANY genre. The fact that he wasn’t even mentioned is crazy.

Also I think the Atomic Clock, Mr Gene Hoglan, ought to have featured higher. There’s others that no doubt deserve mention as much as those in the list: Gojira skinman Mario Duplantier,the recently freelance Mike Portnoy, Igor Cavalera… man, there’s hundreds. Then there’s all the extreme metal drummers that have just insane skills – George Kollias? Kevin Talley? Derek Roddy? But I guess reader’s polls are more of a popularity contest than a real indication of merit, and extreme metal drummers are probably off the radar of mainstream publications like Modern Drummer.

So weigh in, comment below: who’s the best heavy metal drummer in the world in 2011?

Sick Drummer Camp sounds sick

•July 4, 2011 • 1 Comment

A little known fact: in a past life (that is, a long time ago, not an *actual* past life, because I don’t believe in that shit) I was a classical percussionist/drummer. Due to various injuries and general pigheadedness, I changed direction and didn’t drum for over 10 years, although I was always interested in what was going on in the drumming world.

A couple of years ago, Dave surprised me with a drum kit for Christmas – an awesome present for this little goatlady. I played around a little, but due to the stresses of running our business I never really had the time to devote to practicing seriously. Before we moved to Poland, I sadly sold my kit to a young bloke, for his daughter. I did feel slightly better that it was going to a chick.

Anyway, that little bit of background is to help you understand my fascination with drums and drummers, and why I think this upcoming event is pretty fucking cool. Sick Drummer Magazine (an online magazine that I subscribe to, because yes I am still fascinated) is running a 5 day “camp” in Northern California in September. As well as workshops, masterclasses and jam sessions with extreme metal legends like George Kollias and Derek Roddy, they have a bunch of recreational activities as well like go karting, a casino night, and wine tasting. It’s on a 5 acre retreat and the idea is that participants will get to hang out with the instructors over the five days as well as learn from them/gape at their talent. It’s like a drum groupie thing.

I think it sounds awesome. If I was a real drummer and not just a sad wannabe I would definitely want to go. Who knows, maybe now I’m semi-retired I’ll find some time to start playing again. I think I’d need an electronic kit this time, seeing as we live in an inner-city apartment now.

More information: Sick Drummer Camp 2011

Hellfest 2011: the horrible, horrible Coroner and Triptykon scheduling clash

•June 29, 2011 • 4 Comments

Hi, remember me? I used to blog here before my stupid life got too ridiculous. But don’t worry, I fixed it – my partner and I sold our house, our business and most of our possessions and moved to Poland where the vodka is cheap and plentiful, the metal is brutal, and we divide our time between doing things we like and uh… doing other things we like. Semi-retirement rocks.

This post was inspired by the lovely Steff Metal. She posted about the Wacken 2011 lineup and asked her readers what their worst festival scheduling clash was. I tend to get a bit ranty about these kinds of things and the comment box was way too short, so here’s an expanded version of my response.


Hellfest 2011 will be remembered for a number of things, but in my mind, the worst scheduling balls-up of all time will be number one.

When the original schedule was announced, it looked like Swiss thrash legends Coroner – reforming for their first show in 15 years – would be clashing with Bolt Thrower, another legendary thrash band rarely seen live by fans. There was much outrage and in response, the organisers did what should have been a good thing: they changed the schedule.

Unfortunately the change they made was much, much worse: swapping Bolt Thrower with Triptykon meant that the two Swiss bands, both with huge legacies and many, many crossover fans, were on at the same time. Anyone who read this blog last year would know that I’m a tiny bit obsessed with Triptykon. Hence the dilemma.

I was definitely not the only one. On the first day of the festival, wearing my Triptykon hoodie, I was accosted by a drunken man who pointed at my chest and let loose a torrent of French, the only two words I could recognise being the two band names in question. I cut him off with “I know. It’s fucking terrible”. Haltingly he tried to repeat his original statement in English but there was no need: his anguish echoed my own and transcended language barriers.

My new French friend, apologising to the obviously-not-present Tom Warrior, revealed that he had decided he would have to choose Coroner, and that’s when I realised that much was quite obvious. With Triptykon being an active band with a full touring schedule and a stated commitment to record more albums, there would be plenty of opportunities to experience their live show in the future. Coroner, on the other hand, were an unknown quantity, and let’s not forget this was their first performance in 15 years.

Given that Tom Warrior had himself recorded demos with Coroner early on in their career, I figured that he would understand this decision. When I explained this to a friend he joked “what are you going to do, write him a letter of apology?”. Good idea. That’s what this is: my letter of apology. Sorry, Tom.

This story doesn’t end here. I did go to see Coroner. I managed to get reasonably close to the front so I would have a good view. Immediately beforehand, a fireworks show to AC/DC’s For Those About To Rock, We Salute You honoured late French politician and heavy metal supporter Patrick Roy, as well as Ronnie James Dio and Peter Steele. Then there were more fireworks, and then Coroner themselves appeared.

Technically, Coroner looked and sounded great. The guitars and drumming were tight and precise – almost like listening to a recording, only a better quality recording than the Coroner material I’m used to listening to. Given the complexity of the music, the crazy timings and changes, that’s no mean feat to pull off live. The lighting was moody and epic and… I started to get bored.

These were songs I loved. It should have been a momentous experience. That’s when I started to realise that maybe this kind of music wasn’t all that suited to a large festival stage. Or maybe my expectations were overly high. Or maybe they were just not very interesting live. I started wondering about what was going on in the Rock Hard Tent. About halfway through the set I decided to go and find out.

What I found was Triptykon, destroying. I had seen them live the previous year at Summer Breeze, but this was different. The atmosphere in the tent seemed incredibly heavy, oppressively hot even, yet the sound was cold, hollow and bleak – far more raw and “black metal” than their recordings. The pace seemed slowed – although I was there for nearly half the set I think I only heard two, maybe three songs, and Triptykon songs, not the Celtic Frost favourites that I had assumed would close the set, yet despite being intimately acquainted with the two records I could not tell you what the titles of the songs played were. There was inhuman rage in Tom’s voice, and it was mesmerizing. Even the ending of the set seemed serious and ominous – there was no “thank you very much”, only a growl of “Triptykon bows to you” as the band came forward and did just that.

So what was the difference? Was it the stage size, the crowd, my own expectations? Coroner were technically brilliant but lifeless. Triptykon chilled me to the bone, and the half set I saw was unforgettable.

Did I make the right decision? Probably I did. It’s the kind of thing you have to experience for yourself.

2010 in Review; or, what the fuck happened to the Goatlady?

•January 12, 2011 • 2 Comments

During that lovely lull between Christmas and New Year where everyone’s either on holidays or expecting everyone else to be, and pressure to produce anything is next to nil and because it’s hot as fuck here in Australia and sitting the dark listening to music, drinking cold, cold beer and geeking out is pretty much the only way to travel, I was catching up on my feed reading and came across a "2010 roundup" post by the lovely Steff Metal. I was suddenly struck by a thought – didn’t I, also, have a blog, at some point in the distant past?

Just kidding. I hadn’t forgotten about this old place at all. But without degrading this to a “sorry I haven’t posted” post, it has been rather empty and sad lately, hasn’t it? I thought about it some more and thought it would be very remiss of me not to do some kind of round up post. It was, after all, a very epic and exhausting year.

Let’s go month by month, shall we?

January

Early in January I pondered whether the Soundgarden reunion was a good idea or not. As it turns out, some of you thought yay, some of you thought nay, but in the end it was ok. Chris Cornell has not only stopped pissing on his own legacy, but has even grown some hair back.

Who says rock n’ roll isn’t a positive force?

February

In February, my birth month, I got all excited about a new Danzig album, Deth Red Sabbaoth. I pre-ordered the first single, On A Wicked Night, on 7” vinyl and then a few weeks later pre-ordered the limited edition boxset of the album which includes the 7” vinyl single (anyone want to buy one? Mint condition). But it’s ok… the album is good. Better than Danzig 6, Danzig 7 and Danzig 8 in my humble opinion. It’s got a real great old-school feel to it, due in part to his extensive use of vintage gear in the recording process as I’ve read in several interviews.

March

In March I picked up the pace a bit. First I posted my review of Soundwave 2010, which was pretty epic. Although not as epic as the lineup for Soundwave 2011 – but wait, I’m getting ahead of myself…

I then pondered why no one told me they were making a movie about The Runaways. Although at the present time I still haven’t seen the movie, I do own it on Blu-Ray and it’s on the todo list for this week.

My next post for March was an “outtakes” post from my interview with Ruyter Suys of Nashville Pussy. FasterLouder got all “1000 words max” on my arse but she was such a fun person to interview the memorable quotes went way past that, so I figured it was worth sharing. I picked up a copy of their latest album From Hell To Texas when I was in Germany (I don’t think they have distribution down here, unfortunately) and it’s a hard-rocking arse-kick of an album. Highly recommended if you’re in the mood for that kind of thing.

Finally, fan-girl moment of the year came when I got to interview Burt and Dino from Fear Factory, in person, face to face, and on goddamn video. Trippin’ out.

April

April saw more ruminations on the Soundgarden reunion, a post about The Black Crowes taking an indefinite hiatus, a discussion of religion and music in reference to Behemoth, and a recommendation to any of y’all who are interested in blogging to pick up Steff Metal’s ebook on the topic.

By far the saddest post I’d written all year was about the death of Type O Negative’s Peter Steele. We still miss you Pete.

May

I got a little ranty about the state of the world today, Dio and god-botherers, and the bloody Australian government. Nothing you wouldn’t expect from me though. I also talked about our plans for metal travel in 2010 – expect the 2011 version of this soon; announced another side-project in the One Million Beers for Metal web site, said RIP to Slipknot’s Paul Gray (would everyone stop dying please?) and talked a bit about what I’d been listening to.

June

I submitted a public apology to Joey Belladonna for any Anthrax-related ranting I’d done in the past, after hearing his rendition of Man on the Silver Mountain at Dio’s memorial service. And the man himself left a comment which actually seems legit.

I also posted about a fitness class to prepare participants for surviving the zombie apocalypse. Because we all know it’s when the zombie apocalypse comes, not if, right? I also posted some thoughts about the “Big Four” and whether a cinema experience would be worth having. We didn’t go, in the end, and don’t have the Blu-Ray yet although it IS on my “to get” list.

July

In July I got my Danzig tattoo – thanks to my good mate Ox at On The Edge Tattooing. Looking back at that post has made me realise that Charp never saw fit to make good on his promise to punch me in it. That means I still have that hanging over my head (or neck, as it were). Fortunately he’s buggered off to another state so the chances of him making good are slim.

Also in July, I talked about the reformation of Skunk Anansie (still don’t have that album yet) and the second coming of earthtone9, and posted some awesome photos that we took at the South Fremantle Power Station when my pal Leticia came to visit.

August

At this point something funny happened. We went to Europe, had an absolute blast at the Wacken, Party.San and Summerbreeze festivals, and somehow I just… stopped posting. Not sure what happened. Too much in general, probably. Anyway, I didn’t touch the blog until…

September

…when I got quite blog-happy again. First I raved a bit about the No Sleep Til Festival and Megadeth playing Rust In Peace in its entirety. There is a LOT more to that story which will be coming soon – ok a quick spoiler: I got to interview Dave Mustaine, the show I saw was extremely memorable, but other’s reviews were in stark contrast to mine. So I will post them. Like, soon.

Then I talked a bit about the Soundwave lineup. I’ve just realised I promised it would be a multi-part post but never got past the first instalment – but never mind, I’ll get onto that soon.

I posted a book review, which I don’t often do, but it was a really, really interesting and thought-provoking book: The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. I got into it so much I read it twice, back to back.
Finally, I raved a bit about Triptykon and the Shatter EP. Again, there’s a lot more to that story coming soon.

October – November – December

It seems my ridiculous schedule caught up with me again and I didn’t have the time to spare or the energy to write. Which makes me sad.
So here we are, with 2011 bolting out the gates. What will this new year hold for your humble Goatlady?

Well, fact is, things have been very hectic the last year or two. And that’s not entirely a good thing – in fact, in many ways it was a very bad thing. It was all entirely of my own doing, of course, but I’m making a concerted effort to change shit up in 2011.

Will this result in more blog posts? This remains to be seen. However, I really do enjoy writing and this is the perfect platform for me to spew my rantings into the world and see what sticks, so I’d like to think that we won’t see a repeat of the great non-event of October – December 2010 in the future.

As always, that’s a threat, not a promise.

Making me incredibly happy: a new Triptykon EP

•September 12, 2010 • 1 Comment

l_560d878f272c45d8a95339148b37d6f0

Photo by Axel Jusseit

Seeing Triptykon, the new musical outlet of Hellhammer/Celtic Frost originator Tom G. Warrior, at the Summer Breeze festival in Dinkelsbuhl, Germany just a couple of weeks ago was an awesome experience. They played in the small indoor “Party” stage, and while I’m surprised that they didn’t get a main stage spot, it was a fantastic show. I wasn’t able to get a media pass for that festival unfortunately, so no photos or anything else, only a few notes tapped into my phone during the performance and what’s in my head.

Tom’s new bandmates are, not surprisingly, very good players. They’re also very young and pretty, which makes for an interesting contrast with the main man himself. Eparistera Daimones, which I have on both CD and limited edition awesome sauce vinyl, is one of my favourite albums so far this year.

So… that there will be a new EP, Shatter, released next month is an excellent piece of news indeed. The tracklist includes three new versions of songs recorded during the recording of the ED album, and two live Celtic Frost songs from their Roadburn festival show in April, including Dethroned Emperor with Nocturno Culto on vocals. It will be released digitally, on CD and vinyl.

Unfortunately I can’t seem to find a preorder link anywhere…

Book review: The Windup Girl

•September 10, 2010 • 1 Comment

The Windup Girl

I read some reviews of Paolo Bacigalupi’s science fiction novel The Windup Girl, which won Nebula and Hugo awards and was listed on lots of prestigious best-of lists. The general consensus was that it was brilliant, so in June I bought it as an ebook from WebScription for USD $6, which is crazy cheap (and DRM free to boot, being from a small independent publisher, Night Shade Books). I started reading but was distracted by other things, until just last week on the plane back from Europe I got stuck in and finished it.

Wikipedia has a good summary of the novel’s setting (but don’t read the full article if you’re planning to read the book because it summarizes the plot and the ending):

The Windup Girl is set in the 22nd century: Global Warming has raised the levels of world’s oceans, carbon fuel sources have become depleted, and manually wound springs are used as energy storage devices. Biotechnology is dominant and mega corporations like AgriGen, PurCal and RedStar (called calorie companies) control food production through ‘genehacked’ seeds, and use bioterrorism, private armies and economic hitmen to create markets for their products. Frequent catastrophes, such as deadly and widespread plagues and illness, caused by genetically modified crops and mutant pests, ravage entire populations. The natural genetic seed stock of the world’s plants has been almost completely supplanted by those that are genetically engineered to be sterile.

This world, so foreign and alien yet so very believable, is unveiled slowly – so much so, that in the first half of the novel a great deal of the details pass by without their significance being understood. The second half of the novel is increasingly faster-paced with war and conflict, making the complex who-what-where interactions challenging to follow.

It is, however, incredibly engaging and thought-provoking. I go to the end, closed my reader and after a few minutes of reflection, resolved to start again from the beginning right away so that I could fully appreciate the depths of the story and absorb any subtlety that I had missed. It’s not often that a novel is so good that you want to re-read it immediately.

Emiko, the ‘Windup Girl’ referenced in the title, is fascinating but the theme of genetically engineered humanoids and their place in society is, to me, the less significant idea explored. Far more terrifying and real is the background story where corporations wage agricultural warfare in the old-fashioned quest for the almighty dollar, where corrupt governments let anything slide for the right price – and, as character Yates points out early on, ‘people starve all the same’.

We’re monsters living on a fragile planet, people, but maybe not for the reasons you think. Read The Windup Girl and be very afraid.

Soundwave 2011 lineup: part one

•September 8, 2010 • 1 Comment

soundwave-logo

Got my tickets to Soundwave 2011 (Perth show). It’s not until March, but there’s plenty to be excited about.

I’m going to take a look at each of the bands I want to see. The list is far too long for one post, so let’s look at the first few (skipping the punk, emo and wtf bands that is)…

Iron Maiden

imageI’ve not kept my general “meh” attitude toward Iron Maiden a secret. But in fact, a large, very popular headliner that I don’t particularly want to see is a very good thing at a festival – it means that more than likely, I won’t have any annoying clashes and there’s a chance I can sneak away early and beat the rush back home. Win all round.

Queens of the Stone Age

imageQueens of the Stone Age are going to be a little hit and miss, I think. I saw them at the Big Day Out a few years back and they were good, but I’m more a fan of their older material and even then, they had an album or two that I wasn’t crazy about. Now they have a whole bunch of albums I’m not really crazy about. So whether I see them or not will come down to timing, I suspect.

Slayer

imageWhat will be surprising to some is that I’m not all that excited about seeing Slayer either. Yes, they’re awesome. Their live set is always brutal and uncompromising – I’ve seen them a couple of times already so I already know that as a fact.

The problem with Slayer is that their fans tend to be fanatical and often, prone to idiotic behaviour, especially when you get them in groups. At Wacken 2010, one of my mates started making fun of the people screaming "SLAYER!” at every opportunity by yelling it out in a “special” voice with flailing spastic arm movements. Not very politically correct, but very funny under the circumstances, and I don’t think I’ll be able to not think of that next time I hear someone starting “the call”.

The upshot is that when Slayer are playing, I want to stay well back. So if I miss their set as well, I’m not exactly going to cry about it.

Primus

imagePrimus? Now this is interesting. I will most definitely be making an effort to see Primus. Where’d they dig them up from anyway? I haven’t heard of Primus doing anything for ages. Years even… time to do some googling I think.

Slash

imageSlash’s recent solo album is on the office-friendly rotation list – it’s good old-fashioned rock and roll and hey, this is Slash. The coolest of the cool. Highly recommended – although it will be interesting to see how the songs will sound given that every single track on the album has a guest musician on it and he won’t have he entire entourage in tow.

Rob Zombie

imageI’ve never had the privilege of seeing the venerable Mr Robert Zombie live, and also, I never thought he’d make it out to Australia. His live sets have an awesome reputation though, and I love the last album, so this is something to really look forward to. One of the sets on my absolutely, positively must-see list.

Avenged Sevenfold

imageThis is not a band I like. Like many in the metal world, I’m flummoxed at what Mike Portnoy, drummer extraordinaire and Dream Theatre mastermind, is doing playing with them (replacing James “The Rev” Sullivan, who passed away in late 2009). Does Mike know something no one else does? Is he attempting to be hipster and ironic? Has the whole world gone mad?

Having said that, whether I make an effort to see them or not will depend on scheduling.

Until next time…

I’ll go through more bands in another instalment – for now, I’m exhausted! What are you hanging out to see?

‘No Sleep Til’ Festival: an odd lineup, but did someone say ‘Rust In Peace’?

•September 6, 2010 • 1 Comment

image

While we were still out on holidays Dave heard the news that Megadeth were playing Australia in December… which, while excellent news, was a little puzzling since they’ve played here already on their last album Endgame. Then we heard it was with punk band NOFX which seemed even more odd. Eventually we got the full story: it’s a festival called No Sleep Til, it’s touring major capitals in AU and NZ including Perth, and Megadeth are performing their classic album Rust In Peace in it’s entirety. My squeals from Germany could probably be heard all the way back in Australia.

We’re back now and I have bought tickets, noting it’s the day after we see Axl Rose and his session musicians at Kwinana Motorplex (or not see them, as seems to often be the case with Gn’R shows). But I can’t help thinking it’s a really weird lineup. I’m not really into most punk music so NOFX and most of the rest of the bands playing don’t really interest me. The obnoxious Aussie in me does kinda like Frenzal Rhomb… Suicide Silence are a little too “core” for my liking… so really, it looks like Katatonia and 3 Inches of Blood are the only other decent metal bands on the bill.

As Dave pointed out, hopefully the bands we like will be just before Megadeth so we don’t have to hang around all day!

and sin runs down her back

•July 19, 2010 • 1 Comment

IMG_4176

It seems like a million years ago, but in reality was probably about September last year that I decided my next tattoo would be the Danzig demon skull on the back of my neck. If Twitter wasn’t so damn transient I could tell you the exact date, because I announced it in an alcohol-soaked 140-character conversation. But that’s not really the important part of the story.

It took a while to get around to it, schedules being what they are, but now it’s done. The mighty Ox from On The Edge Tattooing (doesn’t he have a great web site?) did the work and the picture above shows the end result, 10 days later and almost completely healed. I’m stoked.

At some point, Al said “if you get a logo of anything tattooed on you, I’m going to punch you in it”. A debate then ensued as to whether the image in question is actually a logo or not, an argument which was not resolved conclusively (I say no, he says yes). He did, however, gracefully allow that he could wait until the tattoo was healed before administering the punching. I’m bracing myself for it any day now, but I feel it’s an ok compromise.

The title of this post is a line from She Rides, off the first self-titled Danzig album (the album bearing the demon-goat-horned-skull silhouette on the cover).  You can listen to the song below. I could have embedded the official video clip but it features some cheesy ‘80s arse and I don’t really want that all over my blog, you know? But it’s a great song and it sounded kind of appropriate.